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Now we’re ready to introduce goals and the operations that build them. Every goal will be an instance of this class:

A goal simply wraps up a block of code, and to pursue that goal in a particular state, the block is called with the state as an argument. So “goal” is really just a nice name for a , but having a dedicated Goal class gives us somewhere convenient to put methods for building different kinds of goal.

There are only four kinds of goal in the language we’re building, and two of them are very basic.

The first kind, called equal , is the only kind of goal that isn’t made out of other goals. An equal goal contains two values, and when it’s pursued in a particular state, it tries to make its two values equal by unifying them in that state.

Here’s an example. We’ll make a new state that has some variables in it, and then use a Goal . equal factory method to make a goal that says x is equal to 5 :

If we pursue that goal in our original empty state, we get back a stream of results:

(We’re using an enumerator to represent a stream here. An enumerator is just an object we can call #next on and keep getting more values out.)

The first result in the stream is a state that says the value of x is 5 :

So the goal has succeeded in making x equal to 5 .

If we try to retrieve another result from the stream we get a StopIteration exception, because the goal only produced one state:

Here’s how Goal . equal is implemented:

To construct an equal goal we have to provide the two values, a and b . When the goal is pursued in a particular state, it unifies a and b in that state and produces a stream of states — an enumerator — as its result.

The code inside the Enumerator . new block yields an output state if unification was successful, otherwise it does nothing, so the resulting stream either contains a single state or is empty.

Explicitly creating variables just to pass them to a goal is a bit inconvenient, which is why we have the other kind of basic goal, called with_variables . The job of a with_variables goal is to run an existing goal and automatically provide it with as many local variables as it needs.

For example, we can take an equal goal that expects to use a variable called x , and wrap it up into a with_variables goal so that the local variable x is automatically created when we need it:

If you are not already using Vundle, and want to use it:

Step 1 : Add this to the top of your ~/.vimrc :

Step 2 : Run this in the terminal:

In order to get the capabilities of VimClojure beyond just indentation and syntax highlighting, you'll need a Nailgun client. It can be downloaded . For completeness, the Nailgun homepage is .

For OSX and Linux, expand the archive, and run:

This will produce a standalone executable, ng , which is the Nailgun client.

For Windows users, ng.exe is provided pre-built in the archive.

In either case, once you have the Nailgun client executable, put it somewhere, either on the sytem path, or in a directory accessible by Vim, e.g. ~/bin/ng . You'll need to remember this location for the "Configuring VimClojure" step below.

Properly setting up the project classpath and running the Nailgun server has historically been one of the trickier aspects of getting started with VimClojure. Fortunately, two things have happened. The Clojure community has pretty much settled on Leiningen as its de facto build tool and Daniel Solano Gómez has developed the lein-tarsier plugin which makes starting a Nailgun server from a Leiningen-based project a piece of cake.

So, for Leiningen 2 based projects add [lein-tarsier "0.9.4"] to the plugins vector of your :user profile located in ~/.lein/profiles.clj . For example:

This setup is covered in more detail in the lein-tarsier readme.

Once the plugin's installed and you have lein-tarsier, you can configure VimClojure in your ~/.vimrc file. Here's a configuration with all the bells and whistles:

Note the setting for the Nailgun client on the last line.

See the VimClojure help for more details on these settings and more.

Most VimClojure shortcuts are initiated with Vim's "local leader", ( :help maplocalleader ). The default value is \ (backslash), but can be configured as follows:

\ will be assumed throughout this tutorial for consistency.

Let's go through the process of creating a simple project to demonstrate some of VimClojure's capabilities. Because this author is a little lazy, we'll use the same example as the emacs tutorial. That is, a simple command-line argument parser.

First, we'll need a new project:

Now we need to start up Vim as well as the Nailgun server. If you're using console Vim, I suggest running each in its own console.

In console 1:

and in console 2

If you're using gvim, just start gvim and then run the Nailgun server:

Now we can start editing code (see Marc Fisher Women’s Loran Fashion Boot Burgundy r7E4727O
below for tips on effectively editing Clojure code in Vim). Let's add a simple test. Execute :e test/command_line_args/core_test.clj , enter insert mode and add the following to the file:

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